Anxiety:

Everyone experiences anxiety at some time. Anxiety can be quite useful in helping a person to avoid a dangerous situation and motivate the solving of everyday problems. Anxiety can vary in severity from mild uneasiness to a terrifying panic attack. Anxiety can vary in how long it lasts, from a few minutes to many years.

An anxiety disorder differs from
normal anxiety in the following ways:

  • It is more intense
  • It is long lasting
  • It interferes with the persons school, work,
    activities, or relationships.

Physical

  • Cardiovascular- pounding heart, chest,
    rapid heartbeat, flushing
  • Respiratory: hyperventilation, shortness of breath.
    • Neurological: dizziness, headaches, sweating,
      tingling, numbness
  • Gastrointestinal: choking, dry mouth, stomach pains, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea

Psychological

Unrealistic and or/excessive fear and worry about past and future events, mind racing or going blank, decreased concentration and memory, indecisiveness, irritability, impatience, anger, confusion, restlessness or feeling on edge or nervous, tiredness, sleep disturbance, vivid dream

Behavioral

Avoidance of situations, obsessive or compulsive behavior, distress in social situations, phobic behavior.

Anxiety:

Everyone experiences anxiety at some time. Anxiety can be quite useful in helping a person to avoid a dangerous situation and motivate the solving of everyday problems. Anxiety can vary in severity from mild uneasiness to a terrifying panic attack. Anxiety can vary in how long it lasts, from a few minutes to many years.

An anxiety disorder differs from
normal anxiety in the following ways:

  • It is more intense
  • It is long lasting
  • It interferes with the persons school, work,
    activities, or relationships.

Physical

  • Cardiovascular- pounding heart, chest,
    rapid heartbeat, flushing
  • Respiratory: hyperventilation, shortness of breath.
    • Neurological: dizziness, headaches, sweating,
      tingling, numbness
  • Gastrointestinal: choking, dry mouth, stomach pains, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea

Psychological

Unrealistic and or/excessive fear and worry about past and future events, mind racing or going blank, decreased concentration and memory, indecisiveness, irritability, impatience, anger, confusion, restlessness or feeling on edge or nervous, tiredness, sleep disturbance, vivid dream

Behavioral

Avoidance of situations, obsessive or compulsive behavior, distress in social situations, phobic behavior.

TYPES OF ANXIETY DISORDERS:

  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder
  • Panic Disorder
  • Social Anxiety Disorder
  • Specific Phobia
  • Agoraphobia
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
  • Any Anxiety Disorder

Generalized Anxiety
Disorder

Generalized Anxiety Disorder main symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are overwhelming, unfounded anxiety and worry about things that may go wrong or ones inability to cope accompanied by multiple physical and psychological symptoms of anxiety or tension occurring more days than not for at least six months.

People with generalized anxiety disorder worry excessively about money, health, family, and work, even when there are no signs of trouble. The anxiety appears difficult to control. Other characteristics include an intolerance of uncertainty, belief that worry is a helpful way to deal with problems, and poor problem solving skills.

GAD can make it difficult for people to concentrate at school or work, function at home, and generally get on with their lives.

Panic Disorder

t is important to distinguish between a panic attack and a panic disorder. A Panic attack is a sudden onset of intense apprehension, fear, or terror. These attacks begin suddenly and develop rapidly. This intense fear is inappropriate for the circumstance in which it is occurring. Other symptoms, many of which can appear similar to those of a heart attack, can include racing heart, sweating, shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness, feeling detached from oneself, and fears of losing control. Once a person has had one of these attacks, they often fear another attack and may avoid places where attacks have occurred. The person may avoid exercise or other activities that may produce physical sensations similar to those of a panic attack.

Having a panic attack does not necessarily mean that a person will develop panic disorder. A person with panic disorder experiences recurring panic attacks and, for at least one month, is persistently worried about possible future panic attacks and possible consequences of panic attacks, such as losing control or having a heart attack. Some people may develop panic disorder after only a few panic attacks, while others may experience many panic attacks without developing a panic disorder. Some people with panic disorder go on to develop agoraphobia, where they avoid places in fear of having a panic attack.

Social Anxiety Disorder

Social Anxiety Disorder is the fear of any situation where public scrutiny may occur, usually with the fear of behaving in a way that is embarrassing or humiliating. It often develops in shy children as they move into adolescence. Commonly feared situations include speaking or eating in public, dating, and social events.

Specific Phobias

Specific phobias are phobias of specific object or situations. The most common are spiders, bugs, mice, snakes, and heights. Other feared objects or situations include animal, blood, injections, storms, driving, flying, or enclosed places. Because they involve specific situations or objects, these phobias are usually less disabling then agoraphobia and social phobia. Phobic Disorders, a person with a phobic disorder avoids or restricts activities because of persistent and excessive fear. They may have an unreasonably strong fear of specific places, events, or objects and often avoid these completely.

Agoraphobia

Agoraphobia involves avoidance of situations where the person fears having a panic attack. The focus of his/her anxiety is that it will be difficult or embarrassing to get await from the place is a panic attack occurs or that there will be no one present who can help. This leads to avoiding certain situations out of fear. Some may avoid only a few situations or places, such as crowds, shopping malls or other enclosed spaces, or driving. Others may avoid leaving home altogether.

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and
Acute Stress Disorder

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Acute Stress Disorder occur after a distressing or catastrophic event. Common examples include involvement in war, accidents (such as traffic or physical accidents), assaults (including physical or sexual assault, mugging or robbery, or family violence), or witnessing a significant event. Mass traumatic events include terrorist attacks, mass shootings, and severe weather events (such as hurricane, tsunami, or forest fire).

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder can be very disabling. Obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors accompany feelings of anxiety. Obsessive thoughts are recurrent impulses and images that are intrusive, unwanted, and inappropriate and cause anxiety. Obsessive thoughts and impulses include fear of contamination, the need for symmetry and exactness, safety issues, sexual impulses, aggressive thoughts, and religious preoccupation. Compulsive behaviors are repetitive behaviors or mental acts that the person feels driven to perform to reduce anxiety. Common compulsions include washing, checking, repeating, ordering, counting, hoarding, or touchings things over and over.

Mixed Anxiety, Depression and
Substance Abuse

Many people have anxiety problems that do not fit into a particular type of disorder. It is common to have features of several anxiety disorders. A person who experiences a high level of anxiety over a long period of time will often develop depression, so many have a mixture of anxiety and depression.

WHAT CAUSES ANXIETY DISORDERS?

Anxiety is mostly caused by perceived threats in the environment, but some people are more likely than others to react with anxiety when threatened. Those more at risk:

  • Have a more sensitive emotional nature and tend to see the world as threatening
  • Have a history of anxiety in childhood or adolescence, including marked shyness
  • Abuse Alcohol
  • Have had a traumatic experience

Some family factors
that increase risk are:

  • Difficult childhood (For example, experiencing physical, emotional, or sexual abuse, neglect, or over strictness)Family background that involves poverty or lack of job skills.
  • Family history of anxiety disorders
  • Parental alcohol problems Separation and divorce

Anxiety symptoms can
result from:

  • Some medical conditions, including such as hypertension, cardiac conditions, respiratory conditions, deficient in B12.
  • Side effects of certain prescription drugs
  • Intoxication with alcohol, amphetamines, caffeine, marijuana, cocaine, hallucinogens, and inhalants
  • Withdrawal from alcohol, cocaine, sedatives, and anti-anxiety medications

Some will develop ways of reducing anxiety that actually cause more problems. For example, if you have phobias and avoid anxiety-provoking situation, this may help in the short term but can then limit your life in significant ways. Similarly, people with compulsions reduce their anxiety by repetitive acts, these repetitive acts can become problems in themselves. Some people will use drugs or alcohol to cope, which can increase anxiety long term.

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Importance of Early Intervention for
Anxiety Disorders

It is important that anxiety disorders are recognized and treated early. Anxiety disorders often develop in childhood and adolescence, and if not treated, the person is more likely to have a range of adverse outcomes later in life, such as depression, suicide attempts, lowered educational achievement, and early parenthood. Also if not treated, the person is more likely to have anger, unsatisfying relationships in their personal and professional lives. Because of these long-term consequences, it is important that a anxiety disorder is recognized early and you get appropriate professional help.

Facts on Traumatic Events

A traumatic event is any incident perceived to be traumatic. Common expanles include, accidents (such as traffic or physical accidents), assault (including physical or sexual assault, mugging or robbery, or family violence), or witnessing something terrible. Mass traumatic events include terrorist attacks, mass shootings, and severe weather events (such as hurricane, tsunami, forest fires).

 

Trauma isn’t always a single event; it can occur over time. Common examples of reoccuring trauma include, sexual, physical, or emotional abuse; and bullying in the schoolyard or workplace. Sometimes the memories of a traumatic event suddenly or unexpectedly return weeks, months, or even years afterwards.

 

People will react different to traumatic events, one person may perceive an event as deeply traumatic, while another may not. Particular types of trauma affect some individuals more than others. A history of trauma may make some people more susceptible to later traumatic events, while others become more resilient.

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Symptoms of a Panic Attack

A panic attack is a distinct episode of high anxiety with fear or discomfort. It develops abruptly and has its peak within 10 minutes. During the attack, several of the following symptoms are present:

  • Palpitations
  • Sweating
  • Trembling and shaking
  • Shortness of breath, sensations or choking or smothering
  • Abdominal distress or nausea.
  • Dizziness, light-headed, feeling faint or unsteady
  • Feelings of unreality or being detached from oneself
  • Fear of losing control or “going crazy”
  • Fear of dying
  • Numbness or tingling
  • Chills or hot flashes
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TREATEMENTS FOR ANIEXTY

As soon as you start to talk about it, it gets better!

Talk to your School Counselor

  • they are there to help you, they can help get you to the right hands so you are able to get the help you need.

Online Text and Chat Help

  • Online Texting and online chat are great resources that allow you to make that first step in the privacy of your home, 24/7, and you can even text anonymously. Start Now.

Crisis Hotlines

Sometimes you can’t get to a professional counselor or psychologist soon enough, or maybe that person wasn’t as helpful as you needed, don’t stop there, keep going until you find someone who can understand your needs and help you. Crisis hotlines are there to help you when you need help 24/7 around the clock. If you are or have been thinking about calling a crisis number, you should call the number. Don’t hesitate, you don’t need to wait until you feel you can’t handle it any longer, these hotlines are there for you and want to help. The sooner you can talk, the easier it will get. Don’t Wait.

It seems easier to try to do it alone, but therapy with a professional can offer tools and insights you just can’t get solely by searching the website alone. There are different types of Therapy, depending on what is covered under your families insurance plans, and depending on what you are most comfortable with, here are some therapy options and the differences:

  • Group Therapy- Being around others who have gone or are going through something similar, and in a safe environment, can help by being able to listen and share tools that have worked for them.
  • Retreats- Going away to a retreat that specializes in something similar to what you are experiencing is like doing a year of therapy in a short amount of time. Most retreats are 2 week- 90 days and offer group counseling and one on one psychology along with meditation and other helpful tools.
  • Counseling- can help assess what your plan should be. A good start is to talk to your school counselor, who can help determine your plan with you. They can also help find a lot of Free or school funded options.
  • Psychologist- are able to offer more structure and provide you with tools to cure you. Sessions are generally 60 minutes but can be 90 minutes if you need more time at the beginning. Typically you will want to invest going weekly for a period of time to get the best results.
  • Psychiatrist- are able to offer medication

FINANCIAL, WHERE TO START…

  • If you have private health insurance, start by calling your provider to understand your coverages.
  • If you are on medicare or want to get on medicare you can start here.
  • If you need financial assistance, NARBA offers an online screening tool to help find you other options you may qualify for, start here.

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